CRIMINAL CASES: Plaintiff / Defendant


  • Criminal Malfeasance

California Protective Services is often retained to perform third party independent investigations of the malfeasance of police procedure or wrongful death cases as it relates to officer involved violence. It is always in the best interest of the public that officers who commit deadly or injurious crimes while in pursuit of justice, be held accountable for their actions and choices. It is in this arena that California Protective Services draws on the experience of our investigators with former positions with the Inspector General. Training in internal investigations and review of professional conduct is a specialized field. Thoroughly educated in police procedures, our investigators help attorneys and judicial officers discover the truth that may be protected by unwritten codes of silence.

 

  • White Collar Crime

The areas we specialize in are the following:

 

  • Blue-Collar Crime

  • Corporate Crime

  • State-corporate Crime

  • Organized Transnational Crime

  • Occupational Crime

  • Occupational Death

 

 

  • Blue-Collar Crime

The types of crimes committed that refer to "Blue Collar" are those employed in relatively unskilled environments and living in inner-city areas have fewer "situations" to exploit than those who work in "situations" where large financial transactions occur and live in areas where there is relative prosperity. Blue-collar crime tends to be more obvious and thus attracts more active police attention such as vandalism or shoplifting. In contrast, white-collar employees can incorporate legitimate and criminal behavior, thus making themselves less obvious when committing the crime. Therefore, blue-collar crime will more often use physical force, and it's the investigation of bribery, threats and risk management that bring our services into full light.

 

  • Corporate Crime

Corporate crime deals with the company as a whole. The crime benefits the investors or the individuals who are in high positions in the company or corporation. The relationship white-collar crime has with corporate crime is that they are similar because they both are involved within the business world. Their difference is that white-collar crime benefits the individual involved, and corporate crime benefits the company or the corporation.

 

  • State-Organized Crime

The negotiation of agreements between a state and a corporation will be at a relatively senior level on both sides, this is almost exclusively a white-collar "situation" which offers the opportunity for crime. Although law enforcement claims to have prioritized white-collar crime, evidence shows that it continues to be a low priority.

 

  • Organized Transnational Crime

Organized Transnational Crime is organized criminal activity that takes place across national jurisdictions, and with advances in transportation and information technology, law enforcement officials and policymakers have needed to respond to this form of crime on a global scale. Some examples include human trafficking, money laundering, drug smuggling, illegal arms dealing, terrorism, and cyber-crime.

 

  • Occupational Crime

Individuals may commit crime during employment or unemployment. The two most common forms are theft and fraud. Theft can be of varying degrees, from a pencil to furnishings to a car. Most employees do steal and the expense is high. Insider trading, the trading of stock by someone with access to publicly unavailable information, is a type of fraud.

 

  • Occupational Death

A death that occurs while a person is at work or performing work is considered occupational death. An example of occupational death is the death of three workers at a pharmaceutical plant. The three workers died after inhaling fatal doses of toxic fumes in September 2005. Two other workers were left with brain damage in 2007. Three operators were fined $350,000 after pleading guilty to charges linked to the death of the three workers for not disclosing the potential of toxic fume contact due to an internal coverup of substandard seals that are supposed to contain the toxic fumes.

 

  • Wrongful Death

Wrongful death is a claim in common law against a person who can be held liable for a death. The claim is brought in a civil action, usually by close relatives, as enumerated by statute. Under common law, a dead person cannot bring a suit, and this created a loophole in which activities that resulted in a person's injury would result in civil sanction but activities that resulted in a person's death would not. Wrongful death is an area of expertise we take great pride in. Our investigative team that deals with these types of cases are former Homicide Detectives and former Insurance Investigators who have decades of experience working cases where a death has occurred. Whether it was a pedestrian fatality, auto-accident, on the job death, treatment death, health care related death, accidental circumstances or murder, our investigators are highly skilled in this area.